Filters

In vitro conservation of banana genetic resources

Contributors to this page: Bioversity International, Belgium (Ines Van den Houwe); IITA, Nigeria (Dominique Dumet, Badara Gueye).

What is in vitro conservation

During the last 40-50 years in vitro techniques have been increasingly used for plant propagation. They consist in growing and multiplying parts of plants in flasks or tubes in artificial media, under controlled environments and sterile conditions.

Common banana in vitro techniques used in conservation are listed below:

Where is it used

An increasing number of countries has invested in tissue culture facilities for the propagation of clonal crops, including banana.

Initially, traditional tissue culture techniques (shoot tip and meristem culture) were used as a tool for the elimination of pests and diseases, rapid plant propagation and for the exchange of clean germplasm. As institutes became more experienced with these techniques, and the number of accessions in collections steadily increased, the available techniques were optimized and extensively adopted for slow growth conservation of germplasm. Until now however very few genebanks have initiated banana conservation activities using cryopreservation techniques.

When should it be used

In vitro conservation techniques should be used whenever technical expertise and facilities are available. They are generally more economic and less risky in a long-term perspective.

How should it be done

References and further reading

Benson E, Harding K, Debouck D, Dumet D, Escobar R, Mafla G, Panis B, Panta A, Tay D, Van denhouwe I, Roux N 2011. Refinement and standardization of storage procedures for clonal crops – Global Public Goods Phase 2: Part III. Multi-crop guidelines for developing in vitro conservation best practices for clonal crops. Rome, Italy: System-wide Genetic Resources Programme. Available here.

Benson E, Harding K, Debouck D, Dumet D, Escobar R, Mafla G, Panis B, Panta A, Tay D, Van denhouwe I, Roux N 2011. Refinement and standardization of storage procedures for clonal crops – Global Public Goods Phase 2: Part II. Status of in vitro conservation technologies for: Andean root and tuber crops, cassava, Musa, potato, sweetpotato and yam. Rome, Italy: System-wide Genetic Resources Programme. Available here.

Benson E, Harding K, Debouck D, Dumet D, Escobar R, Mafla G, Panis B, Panta A, Tay D, Van denhouwe I, Roux N 2011. Refinement and standardization of storage procedures for clonal crops – Global Public Goods Phase 2: Part I. Project landscape and general status of clonal crop in vitro conservation technologies. System-wide Genetic Resources Programme. Available here.

Calles T, Dulloo ME, Engels JMM, Van den Houwe I. 2003. Best Practices for Germplasm Management – A new approach for achieving genebank standards. Technical Report. International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, Global Crop Diversity Trust, Rome, Italy. Available here.

Mafla G. 1994. Conservación de germoplasma In vitro. In: King C, Osorio J, Salazar L, editors. Memorias I Seminario Nacional sobre Biotecnología. Universidad del Tolima. Colombia. pp. 65-77.

Roca WM, Chaves R, Marin ML, Arias DI, Mafla G, Reyes R. 1989. In vitro methods of germplasm conservation. Genome 31 (2):813-817.

Roca WM, Mafla G, Segovia RJ. 1991. Costo mínimo de un laboratorio de cultivo de tejidos vegetales. In: Roca WM, Mroginski LA, editors. Cultivo de tejidos en la agricultura: Fundamentos y Aplicaciones. pp. 912-920.

Szabados L, Nuñez LM, Tello LM, Mafla G, Roa JC, Roca WM. 1991. Agentes gelanitizadores en el cultivo de tejidos. In: Roca WM, Mroginski LA, editors. Cultivo de tejidos en la agricultura: Fundamentos y Aplicaciones. pp. 79-93.

The Genebanks

The 11 CGIAR genebanks currently conserve 730,000 of cereals and grain legumes, forage crops, tree species, root and tuber crops, bananas and crop wild relatives.

close-icon