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Characterization of cultivated chickpea and wild relatives

Contributors to this page: ICRISAT, Patancheru, India (Hari D Upadhyaya, Shivali Sharma, Cholenahalli L Laxmipathi Gowda, Dintyala Sastry, Sube Singh); NBPGR, New Delhi, India (Shyam Sharma); ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria (Ahmed Amri, Kenneth Street, Natalya Rukhkyan), SARC-RIPP, Piestany, Slovak Republic (Gabriela Antalikova); Institute of Plant Genetic Resources ‘K.Malkov’, Sadovo, Bulgaria (Siyka Stoyanova); Department of Primary Industries, Victoria, Australia (Bob Redden); IPK, Gatersleben, Germany (Andreas Börner).

Contents:
Cultural practices
Descriptors
Information

Planting and cultural practices for characterization

Evaluation of chickpea germplasm at ICARDA (photo: ICARDA)

The following are the procedures recommended in the ICRISAT Genebank Manual (Upadhyaya and Laxmipathi, 2009).

Environment

Soil type

Rainfall

Season

According to the ICRISAT Chickpea Germplasm Catalog: Evaluation and Analysis (Pundir et al, 1988a).

Plot size

Sampling area/border area

Plant density

Replications

Standard check cultivars

Frequency of standard checks

Time of day for data collection

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Descriptors

Morphological descriptors for characterization

See chickpea descriptors developed by IBPGR (now Bioversity International), ICRISAT and ICARDA (1993), and
key access and utilization descriptors for chickpea genetic resources developed by Bioversity International and an international advisory group.

Pictures for characterization

They are essential to display variability. They also provide a supplementary description, by images, of the descriptors.

Herbarium samples for characterization

Molecular descriptors for characterization

Cytological characterization

Nutritional traits for characterization

Others

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Recording information during characterization

The following information must be recorded for each accession:

chickpea_diversity_seed

Information about seed colour needs to be recorded during characterization. The photo above shows the many colors chickpea seeds can have (photo: ICRISAT)

References and further reading

Bioversity International, ICARDA, ICRISAT, IARI. 2010. Key access and utilization descriptors for chickpea genetic resources. Bioversity International, Rome, Italy; International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Syria; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, India; Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India. Available here.

IBPGR, ICRISAT, ICARDA. 1993. Descriptors for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). International Board for Plant Genetic Resources, Rome, Italy; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India and International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Aleppo, Syria. ISBN 92-9043-137-7. Available here.

Jambunathan R, Singh U, Subramanian V. 1981. Grain quality of sorghum, pearl millet, pigeonpea and chickpea. In: Proceedings of a workshop held at International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru-502 324, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Nguyen TT, Taylor PWJ, Redden RJ, Ford R. 2004. Genetic diversity estimates in Cicer using AFLP analyses. Plant Breeding 123:173-179.

Pundir RPS, Reddy KN, Mengesha MH. 1988. ICRISAT Chickpea Germplasm Catalog: Evaluation and Analysis. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India. ISBN 92-9066-154-2.

Pundir RPS, Reddy KN, Mengesha MH. 1988. ICRISAT Chickpea Germplasm Catalog: Passport Information. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India. ISBN 92-9066-155-0.

Singh U, Subrahmanyam N, Kumar J. 1990. Cooking quality and nutritional attributes of some newly developed cultivars of chickpea (Cicer arietinum). Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 55:37-46.

Upadhyaya HD, Laxmipathi Gowda CL. 2009. Managing and Enhancing the Use of Germplasm – Strategies and Methodologies. Technical Manual no. 10. Patancheru 502 324, Andhra Pradesh, India: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics. 236 pp.

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The Genebanks

The 11 CGIAR genebanks currently conserve 730,000 of cereals and grain legumes, forage crops, tree species, root and tuber crops, bananas and crop wild relatives.

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